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Most stolen cars for 2010/11

The National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council has identified the most stolen motor vehicles for July 1 2010 to June 30 2011. The data highlights figures for short-term and profit-motivated car theft and is the latest data release since the 2010 calendar year stolen vehicle figures. The top three most stolen cars for short-term benefit are the Hyundai Excel X3, Holden Commodore VN and Toyota Camry SV21. The top three most stolen vehicles for profit are the Holden Commodore VT, Toyota Camry SV21 and Holden Commodore VS.

Short-term thefts

Thefts falling into this category are opportunistic. The vehicles are used for purposes such as joy riding, as getaway cars or simply to travel. There were 40,124 short-term thefts in 2010-11, making up 71% of total vehicle theft (56,779) in Australia for that year.

Cars aged 10 years-plus are more susceptible to theft according to the National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council (NMVTR) and make up nearly two-thirds (23,050) of all PLCs stolen for short-term benefit in 2010-11. NMVTR links this to the car's age profile and the difficulty of fitting older vehicles with an Australian Standards 4601 approved immobiliser. To deter thefts, it is recommended that only immobilisers that meet Australian Standards be installed and their installation should be performed properly.

The top cars involved in short-term thefts are the Hyundai Excel, followed closely by the Holden Commodore, with just thirty less stolen cars. Other cars in the top ten list include the Toyota Camry, Ford Falcon and Nissan Skyline.

Nissan Skyline: proof that older cars still appeal to both opportunistic and profit-motivated thieves.
Make/Model/Series Number of thefts in 2010/11 Number of thefts in 2009/10
Hyundai Excel X3880826
Holden Commodore VN851975
Toyota Camry SV21777929
Holden Commodore VT692652
Holden Commodore VL505587
Holden Commodore VS475451
Holden Commodore VR398455
Ford Falcon383356
Nissan Skyline378364
Holden Commodore VE365NA

Source: National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council (NA: Not available)

Profit-motivated theft

Profit-motivated theft is conducted with the intent to illegally sell either parts from the stolen vehicle or the entire vehicle. The number of profit-motivated thefts in 2010-11 was 16,655. This high volume of profit-motivated theft is concerning - profit-motivated thefts represent 29% of all stolen vehicles, compared to one-in-eight five years ago.

Holden's Commodore ranks high in the top ten list of profit-motivated car thefts, with Toyota models coming second, following by the Nissan Skyline, Hyundai Excel, and Ford Falcon.

Toyota Hilux MY98_04: the 6th most stolen for profit car.

Top passenger/light commercial profit-motivated theft targets, January - December 2011

Make/Model/Series Number of thefts in 2010/11 Number of thefts in 2009/10
Holden Commodore VT263289
Toyota Camry SV21220232
Holden Commodore VS184177
Nissan Skyline167204
Hyundai Excel X3166168
Toyota Hilux MY98_04166132
Ford Falcon AU159116
Toyota Hiace MY90_04157NA
Holden Commodore VX153132
Holden Commodore VL147161

Source: National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council (NA: Not available)

While joy riders and other opportunistic thieves are focused on passenger vehicles, profit-motivated vehicle thieves are focused on where the money is. 2010-11's top 10 profit-motivated thefts include two commercial vehicles: the Toyota Hilux utility at 6th place and the Toyota Hiace van at 8th.

Do you own a car that features on the top stolen cars list? Installing security devices may deter opportunistic thieves and may help reduce your premium. You should contact Allianz* for further information on how different security options can help reduce your car insurance premium.


* Contact us for a PDS so you can decide if the insurance is right for you.


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